Advertisement

You will be redirected to the page you want to view in  seconds.

OMB orders review of classified information handling

Jan. 4, 2011 - 04:23PM   |  
By SEAN REILLY   |   Comments
The initial assessments, which are being supervised by the National Archives' Information Security Oversight Office and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence's National Counterintelligence Executive, are due Jan. 28, OMB Director Jack Lew wrote.
The initial assessments, which are being supervised by the National Archives' Information Security Oversight Office and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence's National Counterintelligence Executive, are due Jan. 28, OMB Director Jack Lew wrote. (Ron Sachs-Pool / Getty Images)

More than a month after ordering agencies to assess their handling of classified information following the latest WikiLeaks breach, the Office of Management and Budget has provided a detailed roadmap on how to do it.

In a Monday memo posted on the OMB website, agencies are given more than 100 questions to address, such as outlining their policies for the use of "removable media" in national security systems and how they decide who gets access to classified information in automated systems. OMB also wants to know whether agencies have "insider threat" programs, whether they require all employees to report contacts with the media, and whether they use psychiatrists and sociologists to measure "relative happiness as a means to gauge trustworthiness."

The initial assessments, which are being supervised by the National Archives' Information Security Oversight Office and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence's National Counterintelligence Executive, are due Jan. 28, OMB Director Jack Lew wrote. Agencies are supposed to come up with plans to address any security weaknesses or gaps.

Support from the two offices "will include periodic on-site reviews of agency compliance where appropriate," Lew said.

The assessments are among several Obama administration reviews set in motion after WikiLeaks began posting a cache of more than 250,000 State Department cables on its website in late November. Suspicion for the leaks has centered on Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, whom the military has charged with illegally accessing more than 150,000 diplomatic cables. Manning is reported to have boasted to a friend that he was behind the leaks.

In a Nov. 28 memo requiring agencies that handle classified information to create the security assessment teams, Lew said the disclosure had "resulted in significant damage to our national security." An OMB spokeswoman did not immediately reply to an e-mail Tuesday asking whether any other steps had been taken.

More In Departments