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Seventh GSA employee sentenced in bribery and kickback scheme

Oct. 25, 2011 - 04:38PM   |  
By SARAH CHACKO   |   Comments
The final GSA employee charged in a bribery scheme was sentenced Monday. GSA Inspector General Brian Miller, above, said the agency began investigating in 2004 when suspicious pruchase card charges were made.
The final GSA employee charged in a bribery scheme was sentenced Monday. GSA Inspector General Brian Miller, above, said the agency began investigating in 2004 when suspicious pruchase card charges were made. (Chris Maddaloni / Staff)

The last of seven General Services Administration employees charged in a contract bribery and kickback scheme that cost the government $750,000 was sentenced Monday, according to information from the Justice Department and GSA inspector general's office.

The 30-month prison sentence of Eric Minor, a GSA customer service manager, marked the end of a multiyear investigation by the Justice Department and GSA's IG. Four contractors also were sentenced in the scheme.

From 2003 to 2010, Minor and six other GSA employees accepted bribes to direct maintenance and construction contracts for federal facilities to the four contractors. The employees also received kickbacks from inflated bills to the government. In some cases, the federal workers also received gifts from the contractors, such as home improvements and lawn maintenance.

The investigation started in 2004 after Floyd Martinez, a special agent for the GSA IG, began looking into suspicious purchase card charges, said GSA IG Brian Miller. Martinez's investigation revealed a web of contract fraud, bribery and kickbacks, Miller said.

Minor, who pled guilty in May to bribery, in addition to the prison sentence was ordered to pay $118,000 in restitution for the kickbacks he received.

In addition to Minor, six other GSA employees in the Washington area earlier were sentenced in the scheme: ‪

James Fisher, a planner and estimator at the White House Property Management Center, pled guilty to one count of bribery. He was sentenced in May 2008 to 18 months in prison and ordered to pay $40,000 in restitution.

William Dodson, a building manager at Potomac Annex, pled guilty to one count of bribery. He was sentenced in September 2009 to 15 months in prison and ordered to pay $26,200 in restitution.

Fred Timbol, a facilities services officer at the U.S. Tax Court, pled guilty to one count of conspiracy to defraud the government. He was sentenced in March 2009 to 18 months in prison and ordered to pay $24,143 in restitution.

Raj Singla, a mechanical engineer at the Wilbur J. Cohen Building, pled guilty to one count of bribery. He was sentenced in May 2010 to five years of probation and six months of home confinement and ordered to perform 100 hours of community service. He was also ordered to pay a $75,000 fine and restitution of $74,000.

Suresh Malhotra, a general engineer and project manager, pled guilty to one count of bribery. He was sentenced in May 2010 to five years of probation and nine months of home confinement and ordered to perform 100 hours of community service. He was also ordered to pay a $60,000 fine and restitution of $57,060.

Gary Thompson, a building manager at the Metropolitan Service Center in Maryland, pled guilty to one count of bribery. He was sentenced in August to nine months in prison and ordered to perform 100 hours of community service and forfeit $55,000.

Four contractors, each of whom pled guilty to one count of bribery, also were sentenced earlier:

Daniel Money, sentenced in February 2009 to 30 months in prison and ordered to forfeit $95,000.

Oscar Flores, sentenced in April 2010 to six months of home confinement, three years of probation and 300 hours of community service and ordered to pay a $40,000 fine.

Tarsem Singh, sentenced in November to five years of probation and six months of home confinement and ordered to pay a $30,000 fine.

Narsinh Patel, sentenced in March to three years of probation, and ordered to perform 250 hours of community service and pay a $10,000 fine.

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