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Top procurement official to step down

Nov. 2, 2011 - 01:48PM   |  
By SARAH CHACKO   |   Comments
Dan Gordon, administrator of the Office of Management and Budget's Office of Federal Procurement Policy, said Wednesday he will leave his post later this year to become associate dean for government contracts law at the George Washington University Law School.
Dan Gordon, administrator of the Office of Management and Budget's Office of Federal Procurement Policy, said Wednesday he will leave his post later this year to become associate dean for government contracts law at the George Washington University Law School. (Thomas Brown / Staff)

The Obama administration's top procurement policy official is stepping down.

Dan Gordon, administrator of the Office of Management and Budget's Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP), said Wednesday he will leave his post later this year to become associate dean for government contracts law at the George Washington University Law School.

The new position, which Gordon will assume Jan. 1, will build on the law school's established expertise in government contracts law, Gordon said in a news release.

"Ultimately, we will want to find new ways to reach students, including potentially nontraditional frameworks, and new ways to explore connections between government contracts law and other disciplines, such as corporate, public international, and anti-trust law," he said.

Before his 2009 appointment to head OFPP, Gordon spent 17 years at the Government Accountability Office in various roles, including managing associate general counsel in the Procurement Law Division, deputy general counsel and acting general counsel.

Gordon was brought to OFPP to rebalance the government's use of contractors, which had grown an average of 12 percent a year between 2000 and 2008, and to improve the oversight of contract spending, OMB Director Jack Lew said in a blog post Wednesday.

"When Dan began at the White House, he brought with him a commitment to openness and integrity, combined with a strong sense of what we needed to do to improve the federal acquisition system, after too many years of neglect," Lew said.

Under Gordon's direction, spending on federal contracting decreased for the first time in 13 years, Lew said. Gordon also worked to leverage the government's purchasing power when buying commodities, helped agencies grow and better train their acquisition workforces, and clarified the line between work that can be contracted and work that is inherently governmental.

Gordon was especially instrumental in bringing open and reasoned discussion back to federal acquisition policy, said Stan Soloway, president of the Professional Services Council trade association, in a statement.

"From his ‘myth-busters' campaign to his commitment to aggressively seeking input from all quarters, Dan has effectively sought to turn an environment dominated by hyperbole and rhetoric into a marketplace of ideas and constructive dialogue," Soloway said.

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