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Acquisition workforce grew in 2010, new report says

Feb. 17, 2012 - 04:48PM   |  
By SARAH CHACKO   |   Comments

The federal acquisition workforce grew in fiscal 2010, though one-quarter of the workforce is planning to retire in the next six years, according to the latest annual acquisition workforce report by the Federal Acquisition Institute (FAI).

Agencies stayed ahead of losses in 2010, hiring 9,970 acquisition employees while losing only 5,880 through attrition, the report shows. Positions include contracting specialists, purchasing officers and procurement clerks.

The workforce grew 6 percent from fiscal 2009 to 74,630, the report says.

An additional 47,959 employees were identified as contracting officer representatives and 4,186 were identified as program and project managers, the report shows. The report did not compare the number of contracting officer representatives and program and project managers to previous years because data were not available.

A quarter of the acquisition workforce plans to retire in the next six years, according to a survey FAI published in September 2010. Eighteen percent of the acquisition workforce was eligible to retire in fiscal 2010, and an additional 36 percent become eligible to retire over the next 10 years, http://www.fai.gov/pdfs/FAI_2010_Annual_Report_12_21_11_FINAL.pdf">according to the report, which was posted Friday to FAI's website.

To help agencies develop the acquisition workforce, FAI is helping create an interagency exchange program. Acquisition employees will be allowed to rotate within or to another agency for a specified time or to obtain a specific skill, the report said. A new training system created by FAI will allow acquisition employees to search and apply for rotational positions across government, electronically apply for training courses, track their training histories and apply for acquisition certifications, the report said.

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