Advertisement

You will be redirected to the page you want to view in  seconds.

Senate confirms Joseph Jordan as new contracting policy chief

May. 25, 2012 - 01:04PM   |  
By SARAH CHACKO   |   Comments

The Senate on Thursday confirmed Joseph Jordan as the Obama administration’s new chief of contracting policy.

As administrator of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP), Jordan will be expected to reduce federal contract spending, consolidate duplicative contracts across the government, and tighten rules to ensure that agencies properly use and manage contracts.

Members of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee pointed to improper contracting practices by the General Services Administration http://blogs.federaltimes.com/federal-times-blog/2012/04/09/the-hits-keep-coming-from-gsas-vegas-conference/">in preparation for a 2010 conference in Las Vegas as an example of the type of waste and abuse that they would like Jordan to stop. GSA’s inspector general http://www.federaltimes.com/article/20120413/DEPARTMENTS07/204130302/">found that officials failed to publish solicitations and use competition when awarding contracts for team-building exercises and audio-visual services at the conference.

Several nominees for high-ranking Defense Department positions were also confirmed, including Frank Kendall as undersecretary for acquisition, technology and logistics; James Miller as undersecretary for policy; and Erin Conaton as undersecretary for personnel and readiness.

Jordan, unlike many predecessors who have served as federal procurement policy administrator, has relatively little federal experience and a more lengthy private sector resume.

Before former OFPP administrator Dan Gordon stepped down at the end of 2011, Jordan joined the Office of Management and Budget in December as a senior adviser on procurement issues.

Prior to that, Jordan spent more than three years as the Small Business Administration’s associate administrator of government contracting and business development. That office oversees programs and services that help small businesses win government set-aside contracts.

Jordan also worked in the private sector helping companies develop purchasing and supply management strategies, and advising state governments on how to cut costs.

During his time in government, Jordan has shown he understands and knows how the work within the contracting community, Gordon said in an email.

“I worked closely with Joe and witnessed his commitment to our federal acquisition workforce, his ability to work with the various stakeholders in our complex acquisition and political system, and his appreciation of the need to support innovative approaches to buying less and buying smarter,” Gordon said.

More In Acquisition