Advertisement

You will be redirected to the page you want to view in  seconds.

GSA bonuses millions higher than previously reported

Aug. 1, 2012 - 03:04PM   |  
By ANDY MEDICI   |   Comments
Jeff Neely, a former regional commissioner for GSA's Public Buildings Service, received a total of $16,000 in bonuses in fiscal 2011 — almost twice as much as the previously reported $9,000.
Jeff Neely, a former regional commissioner for GSA’s Public Buildings Service, received a total of $16,000 in bonuses in fiscal 2011 — almost twice as much as the previously reported $9,000. (Thomas Brown / Staff)

The General Services Administration gave out nearly $30 million in previously unreported bonuses in fiscal 2011. In all, it spent $44 million on employee bonuses last year.

Data uncovered by WUSA Channel 9 show that while GSA accounts for 1 percent of federal employees, it doled out 10 percent of the $439 million in bonus money given to federal employees last year.

John Mica, R-Fla., chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, which has oversight of GSA, lambasted the agency at a hearing Wednesday.

“This is outrageous. Here you have an entire agency of procurement experts working the system to take home 10 times more in bonuses than the rest of the government,” Mica said.

Mica said that one GSA employee with an $84,000 salary earned $115,000 in overtime pay in fiscal 2011. He also said that Jeff Neely, a former regional commissioner for GSA’s Public Buildings Service, received a total of $16,000 in bonuses in fiscal 2011 — almost twice as much as the previously reported $9,000. Neely was chiefly responsible for organizing the 2010 GSA Western Regions Conference in Las Vegas, which cost more than $823,000. The spending for that event was detailed in an April report by the inspector general’s office and referred to the Justice Department for possible criminal charges.

That conference featured lavish food and receptions, as well as a mind reader, a clown and other entertainment. The IG report detailing that event forced the resignation of former administrator Martha Johnson and the firing of senior leadership and prompted the White House to tap Dan Tangherlini to serve as acting administrator.

Meanwhile, GSA is investigating another case of wasteful spending, this time a one-day performance awards ceremony in 2010 by GSA’s Federal Acquisition Service that cost the agency $268,732. Spending on the Nov. 17, 2010, event included $20,578 for 4,000 drum sticks for a drum-playing exercise, $28,364 for 4,000 picture frames that included digital displays telling the time and temperature, and $7,697 for a reception that included a guitarist and violinist. The Federal Acquisition Service manages the $38 billion Federal Supply Schedules program and other large contract programs.

More In Departments