Advertisement

You will be redirected to the page you want to view in  seconds.

Agencies show interest in OASIS contract

Jul. 11, 2013 - 06:00AM   |  
By NICOLE BLAKE JOHNSON   |   Comments
OASIS next steps MWM 20130710
Jim Ghiloni is director of GSA's One Acquisition Solution for Integrated Services. (Mike Morones/Staff)

Agency demand is growing for the General Services Administration’s next generation contract for complex, integrated services, and at least one defense organization has already committed to using it.

The Air Force Life Cycle Management Center plans to use GSA’s One Acquisition Solution for Integrated Services (OASIS) contract, specifically the small business version of OASIS, said Jim Ghiloni, director of the OASIS program management office. Speaking at a contracting conference Thursday, Ghiloni said he expects the Air Force center to spend upwards of $500 million a year through the GSA contract, but sequester budget cuts could affect spending.

“That’s a great anchor tenant for us,” Ghiloni said. GSA plans to issue a request for proposal on July 24 or soon after, and a final award is expected around October, he said.

Headquartered at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio, the center is responsible for life cycle management of Air Force weapon systems from their inception to retirement, according to the center’s website.

GSA is expanding talks with Air Force officials and expects to sign a memorandum of understanding for OASIS to be the preferred contract vehicle for much of the Air Force’s complex, professional services needs. The 10-year indefinite-delivery, indefinite-quantity contract will include professional services such as financial management and engineering, scientific and logistics services.

GSA is also talking with other defense and civilian agencies that expect to use OASIS.

“Essentially, what they’ve said is if it [OASIS] was here we would use it,” Ghiloni said. “And when it’s here we expect to use it.”

But there are uncertainties in committing to a contract, such as potential bid protests that could delay the contract and budget uncertainties affecting how much agencies can spend.

GSA is awaiting internal approval to award the contract without a ceiling value, but Ghiloni estimates there will be billions of dollars in business flowing through the contract.

“If there is as much demand as we’re hearing, this [OASIS] could take off, and I don’t want to have to redo it in four years because we didn’t anticipate success,” he said.

More In IT