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Navy accelerates NGEN completion

Apr. 15, 2014 - 06:00AM   |  
By | AMBER CORRIN   |   Comments
Victor Gavin is hopeful for a September end to NGEN migration.
Victor Gavin is hopeful for a September end to NGEN migration. (Navy)

After a contract-protest delay of more than three months temporarily halted progress on its Next Generation Enterprise Network, the Navy is declaring full speed ahead on the migration process.

The target deadline for transitioning from the Navy-Marine Corps Intranet to its follow-on, NGEN, hovers at the end of this calendar year, but officials are shooting for a September end date and could even finish up initial phases as early as June, according to some Navy officials.

“I think we’re well on our way to making it to a September completion – that’s a three-month acceleration,” Victor Gavin, Navy program executive officer -- enterprise information systems, said April 8 at the Sea Air Space conference at National Harbor, Md.

The NGEN program has faced numerous delays over the years, starting at least with the release of the final request for proposal originally slated for late 2011 but delivered in May 2012. The contract, worth up to $3.5 billion, was awarded to incumbent Hewlett-Packard in June 2013. NGEN faced further delays when competitors launched a protest of the award, but ultimately HP prevailed when the protests were denied, and work on the contract resumed in November 2013.

“It was reported in the press at one point that the transition was delayed,” said John Zangardi, deputy assistant secretary of the Navy for command, control, communications, computers, intelligence and space. “It needs to be noted that there was a three-month protest…we’ve worked with HP and PEO-EIS and reduced the transition time from 12 months to nine months, and that keeps it on time.”

Already, the Marine Corps is well into transitioning to its separate service-wide network, the Marine Corps Enterprise Network, which is government-owned and government-operated. By contrast, NGEN is government-owned, contractor-supported. Both services have been in the processes of purchasing back their infrastructure, equipment and intellectual property from HP, with the Marines buying theirs outright and the Navy purchasing on a payment plan, Federal News Radio reported.

By going their separate ways, the Marine Corps actually has helped the Navy with its own transition from NMCI.

“The Marine Corps transitioned to their version of NGEN…and the lessons we’ve learned from that have helped us accelerate and cut down some of the time [lost] from the protest,” said Terry Halvorsen, Navy CIO.

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