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  1. GSA is looking for feedback on draft terms and conditions for an independent cloud SIN on IT Schedule 70. JONATHAN NACKSTRAND/AFP/Getty Images

    Draft terms released for cloud SIN

    GSA wants comments on how best to create a distinct spot on IT Schedule 70 for cloud offerings.

    • Nov. 21, 2014
  2. Mark Norton (left), DoD senior systems engineer, said derived credentials won't replace CAC but will simplify sending secure emails on mobile devices. Thomas Brown/Gannett Government Media Corp

    Derived credentials to roll out across DoD by July 2015

    The credentials allow mobile devices to send secure emails without need for a common access card to authenticate the user.

    • Nov. 21, 2014
  3. GSA GWAC program Deputy Director Marcelo Olascoaga says a special item number for cloud on Schedule 70 will provide structure and organization. Aaron Boyd/Staff

    Cloud to get original SIN on IT Schedule 70

    Industry's transition from the current distribution of cloud services through several item numbers to a single, dedicated number, will be complicated, GSA official warns.

    • Nov. 18, 2014
  4. To recruit more health care providers, VA Secretary Robert McDonald has proposed pay hikes for VA doctors and dentists. Getty Images

    New data show long wait times remain at many VA hospitals

    More than 600,000 veterans — 10 percent of all the Veterans Affairs patients — continue to wait a month or more for appointments at VA hospitals and clinics, according to data obtained by USA Today.

    • Nov. 17, 2014
  5. The State Department is the most recent federal agency to admit to a breach of its cyber networks. Wikimedia Commons

    State Department hit in cyberattack that also compromised White House

    State Department's email system shut down this weekend to shore up affected network.

    • Nov. 17, 2014
  6. Veteran Affairs CIO Stephen Warren noted that all veteran data compromised in October was the result of human error, not cyberattacks. Colin Kelly/Staff

    Cybersecurity about people, not technology, VA numbers show

    Leaks of personally identifiable information are more likely to come through lost devices or mishandled paperwork than hacking attempts.

    • Nov. 17, 2014
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