Michael Weissenstein

  • In this Aug. 14, 2015, file photo, a U.S. flag flies at the U.S. embassy in Havana, Cuba. (Desmond Boylan/AP)
    The sound in Havana: What Americans heard in Cuba attacks

    It sounds sort of like a mass of crickets. But not quite. A high-pitched whine, but from what? It seems to undulate, even writhe. Listen closely: Some hear multiple, distinct tones colliding in a nails-on-the-chalkboard effect.

  • In this Aug. 14, 2015, file photo, a U.S. flag flies at the U.S. embassy in Havana, Cuba. (Desmond Boylan/AP)
    US spies in Havana also hit by bizarre health attacks

    Frightening attacks on U.S. personnel in Havana struck the heart of America’s spy network in Cuba, with intelligence operatives among the first and most severely affected victims.

  • In this Nov. 29, 2016, file photo, Cuba President Raul Castro speaks during a rally in Havana, Cuba. Raul Castro appeared as alarmed as the Americans. The United States, his nation’s sworn enemy until recently, was demanding urgent answers about a spate of U.S. diplomats harmed in Havana. There was talk of futuristic “sonic attacks” and the subtle threat of repercussions. What the Cuban president did next surprised Washington. Castro sought out Jeffrey DeLaurentis, then the top American diplomat in Havana. In a rare face-to-face conversation, Castro personally denied any responsibility and told DeLaurentis he was equally befuddled, several U.S. officials familiar with the exchange told The Associated Press. (Ricardo Mazalan/A{)
    How Castro responded when US diplomats suddenly got sick

    The way Castro responded surprised Washington, several U.S. officials familiar with the exchange told The Associated Press.

  • The Hotel Capri in Havana, Cuba, is photographed Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017. New details about a string of mysterious “health attacks” on U.S. diplomats in Cuba indicate the incidents were narrowly confined within specific rooms or parts of rooms. Aside from their homes, officials said Americans were attacked in at least one hotel, the recently renovated Hotel Capri, steps from the Malecon, Havana’s iconic, waterside promenade.(Desmond Boylan/AP)
    New details deepen mystery of US diplomats' illness in Cuba

    The blaring, grinding noise jolted the American diplomat from his bed in a Havana hotel. He moved just a few feet, and there was silence. He climbed back into bed. Inexplicably, the agonizing sound hit him again.

  • FILE - In this july 20, 2015 file photo, a member of the Cuban honor guard stands next to a new plaque at the front door of the newly reopened Cuban embassy in Washington. The State Department has expelled two diplomats from Cuba’s Embassy in Washington following a series of unexplained incidents in Cuba that left U.S. officials there with physical symptoms. (Andrew Harnik/AP)
    US, Canadian diplomats in Cuba blame 'sonic device' for hearing loss

    In the fall of 2016, a series of U.S. diplomats began suffering unexplained losses of hearing, according to officials with knowledge of the investigation into the case.

  • Trump to announce plan to stop cash flow to Cuban military

    Stopping short of a complete turnabout, President Trump is expected Friday to announce a revised Cuba policy aimed at stopping the flow of U.S. cash to the country's military and security services while maintaining diplomatic relations and allowing U.S. airlines and cruise ships to continue service to the island.