EVERETT, Wash. — Charges were dismissed against an Everett man accused of sending suspicious packages to the Washington, D.C., area in 2018.

KING-TV reports the indictment against Thanh Cong Phan was dismissed Monday due to reasons related to Phan’s mental condition, according to court documents.

Phan was arrested in March 2018 after the FBI said he sent at least 18 suspicious packages to military installations and government facilities in Washington, D.C., Virginia and Maryland. The packages contained homemade explosive materials along with letters that were “incoherent ramblings” about neuropsychology, mind control, and terrorism.

A U.S. postal inspector used a tracking number on the package sent to FBI headquarters to determine it was sent from Mill Creek. The inspector matched surveillance footage of Phan paying for the package with his Department of Licensing photo.

Phan sent hundreds of letters and emails to government agencies for three years before sending the suspicious packages, according to charging documents.

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