The government shutdown has ended. Here's the impact.

Federal Times Senior Reporter Jessie Bur details the shutdown's impact on the federal government.

Update: Jan. 22, 9:01 p.m.

The White House announced that President Trump signed the House- and Senate-passed continuing resolution, ending the government shutdown. The bill includes funding for the government until Feb. 8, 2018, 6-year funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, a suspension of certain Affordable Care Act-related taxes and back pay for employees unable to work during the shutdown.

Update: Jan. 22, 6:12 p.m.

The House voted 266 to 150 to pass the continuing resolution passed by the Senate just an hour before. Though the votes fell primarily along party lines, 6 Republicans voted against the bill, and 45 Democrats voted in favor. The bill now moves to the President’s desk for signature into law.

Update: Jan. 22, 5:00 p.m.

The Senate voted 81 to 18 to pass a continuing resolution that would reopen the government and keep it funded through Feb. 8, 2018. The bill now goes to the House for approval, which is scheduled to vote as early as 5:15 p.m. tonight.

Update: Jan. 22, 12:59 p.m.

The Senate has voted 81 to 18 to limit debate for passage of a short-term funding bill to reopen the government and keep it running through Feb. 8, 2018. The bill (which also reauthorizes the Children’s Health Insurance Program for six years) then goes to the House for approval, a likely outcome under a Republican majority, and then to the president’s desk.

Democrats managed to get just over two-thirds of their members to vote in favor of the three-week appropriations legislation, though 16 still opposed it. Two Republicans broke ranks to vote against the bill, while one did not vote at all.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-K.Y., promised Democrats last night that he would hear legislation addressing Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients, immigration and border security by Feb. 8 if an agreement was not made on those topics prior to that date.

Speaking on the Senate floor, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., expressed criticism of the White House’s lack of engagement with Democrats during the shutdown, but added that meetings between the congressional leadership from both parties were ultimately successful.

Federal employees furloughed under the nearly three-day shutdown are still scheduled to receive paychecks for work done prior to the shutdown on Friday, Jan. 26, 2018. There is currently a bill on the House floor to provide furloughed employees with back pay for the duration of their furlough, though it was proposed prior to the shutdown and has seen little movement since.

Update: Jan. 21, 9:50 p.m.

After meetings between Democratic and Republican leadership failed to produce conclusive agreement on the contents of budget legislation over the weekend, the Senate has adjourned, leaving the government in continued shutdown. The Senate will reconvene at 10 a.m. Monday, Jan. 22, 2018, with a roll call vote on legislation scheduled for 12 p.m. that day.

Update: Jan. 20, 12 a.m.

The Senate failed to meet the 60 vote threshold to limit debate on the continuing resolution that would have kept the government open for four weeks. The federal government will shut down until the Senate can pass an appropriations bill.

Update: Jan. 19, 7:10 p.m.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-K.Y., announced that the vote to close Senate debate on the House-passed continuing resolution will occur at 10 p.m. tonight.

Update: Jan. 19, 5:00 p.m.

American Federation of Government Employees National President J. David Cox. Sr. told Federal Times that the federation is “bracing for the worst,” as the hours run down to avert shutdown.

“We’re not seeing any indications that anybody’s got anything worked out,” Cox said, encouraging federal employees to become activists and call their congressmen often should the shutdown take place.

Federal employees, contractors and military members are still left wondering whether a potential shutdown will impact their pay, and whether they will be called in to work without pay during a closure.

“It’s devastating to morale,” Cox said. “Our people want to go to work; they want to serve the American people.”

Update: Jan. 19, 3:30 p.m.

Sen. Schumer told reporters after his meeting at the White House that he and Trump made “some progress” on budget negotiations, but that there were still a number of disagreements between the two.

Update: Jan. 19, 2:30 p.m.

Democratic leader Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., recently left a meeting at the White House where he and the president discussed budgeting solutions, as the Senate continues to debate the CR passed by the House Thursday night.

Update: Jan. 19, 9:20 a.m.

After adjourning at 10:15 p.m. Thursday night, the Senate will reconvene at 11 a.m. Friday to consider the continuing resolution passed by the House. It is the last day to pass budget legislation to avert a government shutdown.

Update: Jan. 18, 7:40 p.m.

The House voted to pass the continuing resolution in a vote of 230 to 197. The bill now moves on to the Senate where it faces a more narrow path to success, as Republicans only hold a two person majority there, and Democrats have indicated that they will oppose any bill that does not include protections for DACA recipients.

Original Post

Congress once again must address the threat of a government shutdown, as the third continuing resolution of the 2018 fiscal year expires at midnight on Friday, Jan. 19, 2018. Legislators look likely to pass another continuing resolution to delay full budget appropriations.

The House has passed a procedural vote to allow debate and votes on a continuing resolution that would fund the government through Feb. 16, 2018. The resolution includes six-year funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) and delays on taxes related to the Affordable Care Act.

The resolution does not include a legislative reinstatement of the lost protections for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients, and Democrats have indicated that they will not vote for a bill that does not include such a resolution.

A vote on the CR is tentatively scheduled for 7 p.m. E.T.

This story is ongoing. Check back for updates.